Supreme Court to Consider Internet Sales Tax Collection

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to decide whether to let states require online retailers to collect billions of dollars in sales tax, taking up South Dakota's dispute with three e-commerce companies. South Dakota, appealing a lower court decision that favored Wayfair Inc., Overstock.com Inc. and Newegg Inc., is asking the justices to overturn a 1992 Supreme Court ruling that companies with no physical presence in a state are not required to collect a state sales tax on purchases.

Supreme Court could uphold Ohio voter purge effort

The Supreme Court appeared sympathetic Wednesday to states that seek to prune their voting rolls by targeting people who haven't voted in a while. The justices heard arguments in a case from Ohio, among a handful of states that use voters' inactivity to trigger a process that could lead to their removal from voter rolls.

Does Every Vote Count?


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"Now we can say with certainty: Every vote counts," declared Ralph Northam , Virginia's Democratic governor-elect, last week. He was referring to the still-disputed contest for the 94th district in Virginia's House of Delegates.

CEO: Congress, Not States, Must Patch ACA Subsidies

All eyes will be on Congress, rather than the states, if the Supreme Court should rule that subsidies offered on the federal health care exchange are illegal. "States such as Florida and Texas will have the most to lose if the subsidies go away because of their large numbers of people who are getting insurance through the federal exchange and qualify for subsidies," he said.

Ryan Anderson: Christian Baker Need Not Have Ended Up at Supreme Court

On Dec. 5, the Supreme Court heard the case of Jack Phillips, the Christian baker who can't in good conscience design and create wedding cakes that celebrate same-sex marriages. The justices now will decide whether states, consistent with the First Amendment, can force citizens to express support for same-sex marriage through their artistic products.

Kennedy seems conflicted in Supreme Court wedding cake case

On a sharply divided Supreme Court, the justice in the middle seemed conflicted Tuesday in the court's high-stakes consideration of a baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple in 2012. The court's fault lines were laid bare in a riveting argument that focused equally on baker Jack Phillips' right to refuse to put his artistic talents to use in support of something in which he disagrees and the Colorado couple's right to be treated like any other two people who wanted a cake to celebrate their marriage.

Kennedy seems conflicted in Supreme Court wedding cake case

On a sharply divided Supreme Court, the justice in the middle seemed conflicted Tuesday in the court's high-stakes consideration of a baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple in 2012. The court's fault lines were laid bare in a riveting argument that focused equally on baker Jack Phillips' right to refuse to put his artistic talents to use in support of something in which he disagrees and the Colorado couple's right to be treated like any other two people who wanted a cake to celebrate their marriage.

Pat Buchanan: Why Roy Moore matters

Why would Christian conservatives in good conscience go to the polls Dec. 12 and vote for Judge Roy Moore, despite the charges of sexual misconduct with teenagers leveled against him? Answer: That Alabama Senate race could determine whether Roe v. Wade is overturned.

Trump adds 5 judges to potential Supreme Court nominee list

President Donald Trump has added federal appellate Judge Brett Kavanaugh and four other jurists to his list of potential nominees to the Supreme Court. Kavanaugh recently wrote a dissent when his colleagues on the federal appeals court in Washington allowed an immigrant teen in U.S. custody to have an abortion.

How to Win Justice Kennedy’s Vote

Jeffrey Toobin : "The secret to advocacy before the contemporary Supreme Court is no secret: it's all about pandering to Justice Anthony Kennedy. With the other eight Justices evenly split between liberals and conservatives, lawyers in controversial cases spend most of their energy indulging the idiosyncratic passions of the rangy Californian who sits beside the Chief Justice."

10 Things to Know for Wednesday

The president congratulated hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico for escaping the higher death toll of "a real catastrophe like Katrina" but added "you've thrown our budget a little out of whack." Authorities say shooter Stephen Paddock put a camera in a food service cart outside his hotel room to see if anyone was coming to take him into custody.

Supreme Court takes up key case about partisan redistricting

The Supreme Court is taking up a case about political maps in Wisconsin that could affect elections across the country. The justices are hearing arguments Tuesday in a dispute between Democratic voters and Wisconsin Republicans who drew maps that have entrenched their control of the legislature in a state that is otherwise closely divided between the parties.

Supreme Court opens pivotal term with Trump nominee in place

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito is greeted by a member of the clergy as he leave St. Mathews Cathedral, after the Red Mass in Washington on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. The Supreme Court's new term starts Monday, Oct. 2. U.S. Supreme Court Justices Stephen Breyer, top, Clarence Thomas, center, and Anthony Kennedy, leave St. Mathews Cathedral, after the Red Mass in Washington on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017.

Supreme Court conservatives on rise as important term begins

Disputes over a wedding cake for a same-sex couple and partisan electoral maps top the Supreme Court's agenda in the first full term of the Trump presidency. Conservatives will look for a boost from the newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, in a year that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has said will be momentous.

Trump Administration Wants to Investigate Universities for Affirmative Action

The Justice Department 's civil rights division is poised to examine and potentially litigate race-based affirmative action admissions policies at U.S. colleges and universities, the Details of the Trump administration's directive are scarce, but the Times reported that the department's political appointees could lead the project. The Trump administration has made no public statement on the report.

Gorsuch can’t escape travel ban at San Francisco meeting

President Donald Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court couldn't escape discussion of the president's travel ban - and even the president - during an appearance Monday at a judicial conference, where a student essay winner compared the ban to Japanese internment and the producer of the musical "Hamilton" said the cast was scared following Trump's election victory. Gorsuch was a late fill-in at the 9th Circuit conference for fellow Supreme Court justice Anthony Kennedy and took over what was supposed to be Kennedy's role of welcoming new U.S. citizens.

The Justices Agree to Grapple With Travel Bans and Phantoms


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President Donald Trump's travel ban is in one of the biggest cases of the upcoming October term. That is, if it doesn't disappear--poof!--like an enchanted carriage at midnight.

Supreme Court term ended much different than it began

People visit the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term, in Washington. The Supreme Court began its term nine months ago with Merrick Garland nominated to the bench, Hillary Clinton favored to be the next president, and the court poised to be controlled by Democratic appointees for the first time in 50 years.

U.S. top court to rule on last cases as talk about Kennedy swirls

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to issue the final rulings of its current term on Monday, including one on religious rights, amid talk that swing voter Justice Anthony Kennedy is considering retirement. The court in the coming days is also expected to act on President Donald Trump's emergency request seeking to revive his travel ban on people entering the United States from six Muslim-majority countries, which was blocked by lower courts.

The Next Liberal Lamentation

What's the most hated Supreme Court decision on the left of the last few years? Why, Citizens United , of course, which leftists blame for just about every bad imaginable. Aggrieved leftists often compare it to the Dred Scott decision -seriously, they do.

Big cases, retirement rumors as Supreme Court nears finish

The Supreme Court enters its final week of work before a long summer hiatus with action expected on the Trump administration's travel ban and a decision due in a separation of church and state case that arises from a Missouri church playground. The biggest news of all, though, would be if Justice Anthony Kennedy were to use the court's last public session on Monday to announce his retirement.

Next 25 Articles

A secretive Washington firm that commissioned the dubious intelligence dossier on Donald Trump is stonewalling congressional investigators trying to learn more about its connections to the Democratic Party. The Senate Judiciary Committee earlier this month threatened to subpoena the firm, Fusion GPS, after it refused to answer questions and provide records to the panel identifying who financed the error-ridden dossier, which was circulated during the election and has sparked much of the Russia scandal now engulfing the White House.

Councillor in charge of Grenfell Tower refurb FLEES home

Third time's a charm! Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin marries his Scottish actress fiancee in front of Trump, Melania and Ivanka in lavish, star-studded DC ceremony University of Delaware professor is slammed for saying North Korea prisoner Otto Warmbier was a 'privileged, rich, clueless white male' who 'got exactly what he deserved' Boy, 8, dies a week after being placed in an induced coma when he was pulled unconscious from a wave pool at a Las Vegas water park 'She was crying and screaming in pain': Couple arrested after 'putting a disabled teenager in a bath tub full of bleach and Epsom salt causing third-degree burns' Texas mom, 25, charged in deaths of her two young children after she 'left them in a hot car to punish them while she smoked pot and took a nap' Trump may soon get to pick ANOTHER Supreme Court justice as rumors abound that Anthony Kennedy could announce his ... (more)

Man, 38, charged with 122 domestic violence offences

Third time's a charm! Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin marries his Scottish actress fiancee in front of Trump, Melania and Ivanka in lavish, star-studded DC ceremony University of Delaware professor is slammed for saying North Korea prisoner Otto Warmbier was a 'privileged, rich, clueless white male' who 'got exactly what he deserved' Boy, 8, dies a week after being placed in an induced coma when he was pulled unconscious from a wave pool at a Las Vegas water park 'She was crying and screaming in pain': Couple arrested after 'putting a disabled teenager in a bath tub full of bleach and Epsom salt causing third-degree burns' Texas mom, 25, charged in deaths of her two young children after she 'left them in a hot car to punish them while she smoked pot and took a nap' Trump may soon get to pick ANOTHER Supreme Court justice as rumors abound that Anthony Kennedy could announce his ... (more)

Big cases, retirement rumors as Supreme Court nears finish

The Supreme Court enters its final week of work before a long summer hiatus with action expected on the Trump administration's travel ban and a decision due in a separation of church and state case that arises from a Missouri church playground. The biggest news of all, though, would be if Justice Anthony Kennedy were to use the court's last public session on Monday to announce his retirement.

Matt Damon and wife Luciana Barroso enjoy dinner date

'Please god just let the man sleep': Outrage as airline passenger posts racist Snapchat story of Sikh man whom he mistakenly believed to be a terrorist Joe Biden shuts down 'wiseass' hedge fund manager Bill Ackman after he 'disrespected the memory' of his dead son Beau First pictures of five people electrocuted in Turkish water park horror - including three children and the owner and his son who died trying to save them Trump may soon get to pick ANOTHER Supreme Court justice as rumors abound that Anthony Kennedy could announce his retirement Texas mom, 25, charged in deaths of her two young children after she 'left them in a hot car to punish them while she smoked pot and took a nap' Sixteen-month-old Brooklyn toddler dies five days after she 'was viciously beaten unconscious by her dad during a visit on Father's Day' 'Build bridges not walls': UK Leader of the Opposition party Jeremy ... (more)

James Blunt and wife Sofia Wellesley attend Royal Ascot

'Please god just let the man sleep': Outrage as airline passenger posts racist Snapchat story of Sikh man whom he mistakenly believed to be a terrorist Joe Biden shuts down 'wiseass' hedge fund manager Bill Ackman after he 'disrespected the memory' of his dead son Beau First pictures of five people electrocuted in Turkish water park horror - including three children and the owner and his son who died trying to save them Trump may soon get to pick ANOTHER Supreme Court justice as rumors abound that Anthony Kennedy could announce his retirement Texas mom, 25, charged in deaths of her two young children after she 'left them in a hot car to punish them while she smoked pot and took a nap' Sixteen-month-old Brooklyn toddler dies five days after she 'was viciously beaten unconscious by her dad during a visit on Father's Day' 'Build bridges not walls': UK Leader of the Opposition party Jeremy ... (more)

Anthony Kennedy retirement watch at a fever pitch

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy is seen during a ceremony in the Rose Garden at the White House April 10, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Earlier in the day Gorsuch, 49, was sworn in as the 113th associate justice in a private ceremony at the Supreme Court. WASHINGTON - Justice Anthony Kennedy, the man who so often determines the outcome of the most controversial Supreme Court cases, is himself the center of brewing speculation.

Supreme Court limits rights of property owners

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday narrowed the rights of property owners in disputes with governments and laid out a formula for determining when landowners are owed compensation in a case involving a vacant lot in Wisconsin on the picturesque St. Croix River. The court decided that government officials can combine separate parcels of private land in determining whether public officials have effectively taken private property through zoning laws and must pay compensation.

U.S. Supreme Court limits ability to strip citizenship over minor lies during naturalization process


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President Donald Trump's efforts to tighten the screws on immigration suffered a blow Thursday when the Supreme Court set more restrictions on the government's ability to strip naturalized Americans of U.S. citizenship. In a unanimous 9-0 vote, the justices said a naturalized American citizen can only be stripped of the status for lying to the government if the false statements would have led officials to deny his or her original entry into the country as an immigrant.

A critical church-state separation case in the making


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Last year, Church Executive published an interview with David Middlebrook on the Trinity Lutheran Church v. Pauley case , which the Supreme Court had just agreed to review.

Sandra Day O’Connor makes this year’s ‘Time 100’

Sandra Day O'Connor on this year's 'Time 100' First woman Supreme Court justice, an El Paso native, makes Time magazine's list of 100 most influential people. Check out this story on ElPasoTimes.com: President Trump, James Corden and Simone Biles are just a few of the names that made it on their annual list.

Supreme Court appears ready to break down a church-state barrier in certain circumstances

The Supreme Court on Wednesday appeared ready to break down at least part of the longstanding church-state barrier that has prevented religious schools from receiving public funds. The justices gave a skeptical hearing to a Missouri lawyer who was defending the state's decision to reject a grant request from a Lutheran preschool seeking to participate in a state program that provides money to schools to rubberize the surface of their playgrounds.

Wednesday, April 12

This section includes: Health News, Entertainment News, This Day in History, Tourism, Out & About, Movies & Videos, Restaurant Menus, Recipes, & Pets B roadway Street from North Kickapoo west to the alleyway in downtown Lincoln is temporarily closed.

As the freshman Supreme Court justice, Neil Gorsuch will have…


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Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr., and fellow justices watch as Neil Gorsuch signs the Constitutional Oath after Roberts administered the Constitutional Oath in a private ceremony, Monday, April 10, 2017, in the Justices' Conference Room at the Supreme Court in Washington. Start by making him take notes and answer the door at the justices' private meetings.

High court whole as Gorsuch sworn in

Justice Neil Gorsuch took his place in history Monday as the newest addition on the bench of the Supreme Court, restoring a narrow conservative majority and marking a much-needed political victory for President Donald Trump.

Gorsuch sworn into Supreme Court, vows to serve Constitution

President Donald Trump praised new Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch during a public White House ceremony on Monday as a jurist who will rule "not on his personal preferences but based on a fair and objective reading of the law." In a Rose Garden ceremony, Trump said Americans would see in Gorsuch "a man who is deeply faithful to the Constitution of the United States" and predicted greatness for the 49-year-old former appeals court judge from Colorado.

Gorsuch takes Supreme Court seat after divisive confirmation

With a divisive confirmation process behind him, Judge Neil Gorsuch is about to take his place as the newest Supreme Court justice. The 49-year-old appeals court judge from Colorado is to be sworn in Monday after a bruising fight that saw Republicans change the rules for approving Supreme Court picks - over the fierce objection of Democrats.

Neil Gorsuch Takes First of Two Oaths for Supreme Court

Surrounded by family and his future colleagues, Neil Gorsuch has taken the first of two oaths as he prepares to take his place as the 113th justice of the Supreme Court. The 49-year-old appeals court judge from Colorado is being sworn in Monday after a bruising fight that saw Republicans change the rules for approving Supreme Court picks - over the fierce objection of Democrats.

The Latest: Gorsuch takes first of 2 oaths

Visitors arrive at the Supreme Court as the Senate votes to confirm President Donald Trump's high court nominee Neil Gorsuch, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, April 7, 2017. Visitors arrive at the Supreme Court as the Senate votes to confirm President Donald Trump's high court nominee Neil Gorsuch, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, April 7, 2017.

Gorsuch takes Supreme Court seat after divisive confirmation

The 49-year-old appeals court judge from Colorado is to be sworn in after a bruising fight that saw Republicans change rules for approving Supreme Court picks over the fierce objection of Democrats. First up is a private ceremony at the court, with Chief Justice John Roberts administering the constitutional oath.

Neil Gorsuch will be sworn in today. His effect on a divided Supreme Court begins immediately.

Neil M. Gorsuch joins the Supreme Court today, just in time to cast potentially significant votes in cases that pit religious liberty against gay rights, test limits on funding for church schools and challenge California's restrictions on carrying a concealed gun in public. Such issues arise either in appeals filed by conservative groups that have been pending before the justices for weeks or in cases to be heard later this month.

How Neil Gorsuch could affect the Supreme Court

Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's pick to fill the Supreme Court slot left open following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, was confirmed by the Senate after a bruising fight when the upper chamber's majority leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell, invoked the so-called "nuclear option," which allowed Republicans to end debate without 60 votes and subsequently push through the nomination. To help understand why the addition of Gorsuch, a judicial conservative ideologically similar to Scalia, to the nation's highest court matters, we reached out to Kate Shaw, an ABC News contributor and a Cardozo School of Law professor.

Straight To Work

Now that Judge Neil Gorsuch will officially become an associate justice of the Supreme Court today, it is now time to put the partisan battle that preceded his confirmation in the rear view mirror for just a moment to look at the effect his joining the highest court in the land may have on pending judicial matters. As has been chronicled in detail, Mr. Gorsuch will take the place of the late Antonin Scalia, and most pundits expect the newest justice to mirror Scalia in his judicial philosophy.

How Gorsuch Is Preparing For His First Day At The Supreme Court

Neil Gorsuch will be formally invested Monday as the 101st associate justice of the Supreme Court, though there will be little time for fanfare. The steady stream of petitions and briefs that make up much of a judge's typical day will not abate for the high court's newest member, who was confirmed by the Senate on a 54-45 vote last week.

Senate set to approve Trump’s conservative Supreme Court pick


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U.S. Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch is sworn in to testify at his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. on March 20, 2017. The Republican-led U.S. Senate was poised on Friday to confirm President Donald Trump's Supreme Court pick, conservative appeals court judge Neil Gorsuch, providing the president with his first major victory since taking office in January.

‘Nuclear option’ fallout means more extreme U.S. justices, experts say


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A Republican-backed Senate rule change expected on Thursday could make it more likely that presidents will pick ideologically extreme U.S. Supreme Court nominees with little incentive to choose centrist justices, experts said. With a deep partisan divide in Washington, Democrats are using a procedural tactic called a filibuster to try to block confirmation of President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch in the Republican-led Senate.

Gorsuch may be decisive vote in divisive Supreme Court cases

With Neil Gorsuch's confirmation as the 113th Supreme Court justice expected on Friday, it won't be long before he starts revealing what he really thinks about a range of hot topics he repeatedly sidestepped during his confirmation hearing. In less than two weeks, the justices will take up a Missouri church's claim that the state is stepping on its religious freedom.

Supreme Court rules in redistrcting case

The Supreme Court is mainly ruling for African-Americans in Virginia who say lawmakers packed 12 legislative districts with black voters to make other districts whiter and more Republican. The justices said Wednesday that a lower court that upheld the 12 districts used the wrong legal standard when it determined that race did not play too large a role in creating the districts.

Ivanka Trump and daughter go to the Supreme Court

The first daughter is there as an invited guest as Justice Anthony Kennedy, whom she met at the inaugural lunch at the Capitol last month just after her father's swearing-in ceremony. Supreme Court justices often host guests for arguments, and there is a gallery above the courtroom where visitors are able to observe the judicial branch in action.

Supreme Court seems split in case of boy’s death near border

The Supreme Court appears to be evenly divided about the right of Mexican parents to use American courts to sue a U.S. Border Patrol agent who fired across the U.S.-Mexican border and killed their teenage son. Justice Anthony Kennedy and other conservative justices suggested during argument Tuesday that the boy's death on the Mexican side of the border was enough to keep the matter out of U.S. courts.

David M. Shribman

Without issuing an opinion - no ruling on school desegregation, no decision on abortion rights - the Supreme Court is at the center of perhaps its gravest constitutional crisis in eight decades. The stakes could not be higher, the implications could not be greater, the consequences could not be more far-reaching.

Trump’s Supreme Court pick goes to Republican Senate

Judge Neil Gorsuch was announced as President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Tuesday - a nomination that could fill the Supreme Court's vacant seat that has gone unfilled since Justice Antonin Scalia's death in February 2016. Gorsuch's nomination does not come as a surprise, Assoc.

Where Does Gorsuch Stand on Tech and the Law?


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President Trump is an avid Twitter user, but otherwise avoids technology. Justice Scalia once wondered, during oral arguments, whether one could print off text messages and share them with their friends.

Trump picks judge Neil Gorsuch for Supreme Court

Judge Neil Gorsuch and his wife Marie Louise listen after U.S. President Donald Trump nominated him for the Supreme Court, at the White House in Washington, D.C., the United States , Jan. 31, 2017. U.S. President Donald Trump announced Tuesday night he picked judge Neil Gorsuch as the new justice for the Supreme Court, which has been evenly divided between Democratic appointees and Republican ones since Justice Antonin Scalia died last February.

Continue reading Trump nominates Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court

President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court on Tuesday, selecting a young jurist well-regarded in conservative legal circles as his pick to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia. A Denver native, Gorsuch was appointed by President George W. Bush to the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2006 after serving in Bush's Justice Department.

5 Faith Facts on the presumed Supreme Court nominees

President Donald Trump is expected to announce his first Supreme Court nominee to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died last February. Pundits have whittled the new president's list of potential candidates to two: Neil Gorsuch, currently a federal judge on 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver and Thomas Hardiman.

A look at the reported top contenders for the Supreme Court

A look at Neil Gorsuch, Thomas Hardiman and William Pryor, the federal appeals court judges who are seen as the leading candidates to be President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court. Each was appointed to the appellate bench by President George W. Bush, appeared on Trump's list of 21 possible choices that he made public during the campaign and has met with Trump to discuss the vacancy that arose when Justice Antonin Scalia died nearly a year ago.

Trump narrows down Supreme Court nominee list to 3

WASHINGTON >> President Donald Trump has narrowed his choice to fill the Supreme Court vacancy to three judges and said he expects to make his decision in the coming days. A person familiar with the selection process said the three judges, all white men who sit on federal appeals courts, were on the list of 21 potential high court picks Trump announced during the presidential campaign.

Judge Neil Gorsuch Emerges as Leading Contender for Supreme Court

The snow ... - Virginia police issued a missing and endangered alert for a young mother and her two children who disappeared after she had been out on a blind d... - The parents of an American who has been detained in Venezuela since June are calling on President Donald Trump to "do what the previous administrati... Governor Pete Ricketts issued a statement following news that President Donald J. Trump had signed an executive order withdrawing the United States from the Trans-Pacific Part... The Casper College men's basketball team put five players in double figures in registering an 82-74 win over Western Nebraska Community College on Monday night at Cougar Pal... - Here are the latest scores and winners: NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONWashington 109, Charlotte 99Miami 105, Golden State 102Sacramento 109, Detroit 104San... - ABC News has learned that Judge Neil Gorsuch has emerged as ... (more)

Supreme Court unlikely to overturn abortion rights anytime soon

Supreme Court unlikely to overturn abortion rights anytime soon President Trump needs more than one new Supreme Court justice to reverse Roe v. Wade Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/2kcvqBM Demonstrators on both sides of the abortion issue demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court last June, around the time the justices struck down a Texas law that restricted access to abortions.

A Reminder

Justice Anthony Kennedy will be 85 years old by the end of President Trump's first term. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be almost 88.

Supreme Court nominations will never be the same

The story of the Supreme Court in 2016 can be summarized in a statistic: It's been 311 days since Justice Antonin Scalia died on Feb. 13, and his seat remains unfilled. That's not the longest Supreme Court vacancy in the modern era, but it's about to enter second place - and it will become the longest if Donald Trump's nominee isn't confirmed before the end of March.

Supreme Court takes up cases about race in redistricting

This Nov. 15, 2016 photo shows a view of the Supreme Court from the Capitol Dome, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The eight-justice court is hearing arguments Monday in two cases that deal with the same basic issue of whether race played too large a role in the drawing of electoral districts, to the detriment of African-Americans.

Pregnancy, privacy and Trump’s promise

The future of privacy under the U.S. Constitution - and the critical protection of rights such as abortion and same-sex marriage - rests on the continued good health and mental acuity of three lawyers age 78 and older. If you care about these things, and you should, you really should be sending vitamin packets, kale salads and protein smoothies to Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg , Anthony Kennedy and Stephen Breyer .

Supreme Court takes up hospital pension dispute

The Supreme Court will decide whether some of the nation's largest health providers can rely on their church affiliations to avoid complying with federal laws covering pension benefits for workers. The justices agreed Friday to take up cases involving three nonprofit hospital systems being sued for underfunding their employee pension plans.

Supreme Court hears cases about use of race in redistricting

The Supreme Court is returning to the familiar intersection of race and politics, in a pair of cases examining redistricting in North Carolina and Virginia. The eight-justice court is hearing arguments Monday in two cases that deal with the same basic issue of whether race played too large a role in the drawing of electoral districts, to the detriment of African-Americans.

“Unconstitutional gerrymander”: Federal court strikes…

With the 2016 election, Donald Trump became the first Republican presidential candidate to win Wisconsin in nearly 30 years and Republicans took control of nearly two-thirds of the Legislature, including their largest majority in the Assembly since 1957, despite a roughly even split of votes between Democrats and Republicans in statewide races. On Monday, a federal court overturned Wisconsin's Republican-drawn legislative maps as an "unconstitutional gerrymander" that likely played a major factor in the party's disproportionate electoral success.

US Supreme Court reinstates Arizona ballot collection ban

The U.S. Supreme Court on Saturday reinstated an Arizona law that makes it a felony to collect early ballots, stepping into a contentious political issue days before the presidential election and dealing a blow to Democratic get-out-the-vote efforts. The unsigned order from the nation's highest court overturns an appeals court decision from a day earlier that blocked the new law and drew celebration from Democrats.

Supreme Court permits Arizona ban on third party ballot collection

The U.S. Supreme Court sided with Republicans and ordered a law in Arizona banning ballot collecting by third party groups can stand in Tuesday's election. Republicans in Arizona passed the ballot collection law, making it a felony punishable by up to a year in jail and a $150,000 fine for someone to turn in a ballot that is not their own.

Nightmare: Election dispute goes to 8-member Supreme Court

What happens if America wakes up on Nov. 9 to another undecided, hotly disputed presidential election? What if the outcome turns on the razor-thin margin in one or two states, one candidate seeking a recount, the other going to court? We know what happened in 2000, when the Supreme Court in a 5-4 vote effectively settled the election in As controversial as that decision was, it was made by a nine-justice court. This time around, there are only eight justices and the possibility of a tie vote.

Mark Paoletta

Today is the 25th anniversary of Clarence Thomas being sworn in as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. From his beginnings in Pin Point, Georgia, where he lived in a shanty without indoor plumbing during the Jim Crow era, he has become the longest-serving black justice on the nation's highest court.

The New Pro-Life Movement: Neither New nor Pro-Life

Now that the practical choice is between coughing Clinton and terrifying Trump, the Seamless Garment crowd is making new attempts to co-opt pro-life sentiment in favor of the vociferously pro-abortion candidate that is, Clinton. This New Pro-Life Movement is supposedly bolder, more sincere, more consistent, and especially more "prudent" than the old one.

Why it Matters: Supreme Court

THE ISSUE: No one likes an even number on a court that makes decisions by majority vote. Yet that's just what the Supreme Court has been left with, eight justices, since the death of Antonin Scalia in February.

Who Are the Most Successful Harvard Law Graduates?


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Harvard Law has topped numerous Best Of lists, and now Business Insider has created a new ranking-of the most famously successful Harvard Law alumni. From the President of the United States to the CEO of Goldman Sachs, Business Insider thinks these 14 alums are the cream of the crop.

The Supreme Court may be taking a left turn on issues

Supreme Court may be converting on religion Protections for religious liberty could give way to discrimination claims Check out this story on CurrentArgus.com: http://usat.ly/2anR8P9 Still reeling from the death of its most devout justice, Antonin Scalia, the high court has put preventing discrimination above protecting religion in a series of cases over the past year, from same-sex marriage to abortion and contraception. It took an obscure order issued on the last day of the recent term for Justice Samuel Alito to drive home the point.

Mitch McConnell: A Legacy of Obstruction

Next Tuesday marks 125 days since President Barack Obama nominated D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Chief Judge Merrick Garland, an eminently qualified judge, to fill the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. The Senate's inaction on the Garland nomination is the longest a Supreme Court nominee has ever waited for a hearing or confirmation.

It’s fine for Supreme Court justices to speak their mind

Doesn't everyone have an outspoken Jewish grandmother? That was my thought on reading the indignant commentary on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's unflattering assessment of Donald Trump in an interview with the New York Times. To put the point more seriously, there's nothing wrong with a sitting Supreme Court justice expressing her personal political views when they don't implicate any case that's currently before the court.

Suffocating in fact-free cocoons

Republican lawmakers in Wisconsin were operating in a "fact-free cocoon" of partisan prejudice when they claimed that voter fraud was a major problem in their state, wrote federal judge Richard Posner in 2014. "If the Wisconsin legislature says witches are a problem, shall Wisconsin courts be permitted to conduct witch trials?" Posner is a conservative appointed by Ronald Reagan.

Shocker! Anthony Kennedy Is a Schmuck – and We Still Got Schlonged by Him


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"We agree with the District Court that the surgical-center requirement, like the admitting-privileges requirement, provides few, if any, health benefits for women, poses a substantial obstacle to women seeking abortions, and constitutes an 'undue burden' on their constitutional right to do so," Breyer wrote. Justice Anthony Kennedy proved the swing vote, joining Breyer in the majority, but declining to write a concurring opinion.

Denton gay couples reflect on first anniversary of marriage ruling

Tod King, left, and Casey Cavalier hold their adopted son, 3-year-old Eddie, for a portrait in their home in Denton. King and Cavalier were the first same-sex couple to try to seek a marriage license at the Denton County Courts Building following the June 26, 2015, Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage nationwide.

Supreme Court Upholds Race-Based University Admissions


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In a victory for affirmative action advocates, the Supreme Court upheld the University of Texas's admissions criteria that takes an applicant's race into account . The case was brought by a white female applicant, Abigail Fisher, who was denied admission to the university in 2008 and claimed that the school's holistic "Personal Achievement Index" violated the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause .

Texas affirmative action plan survives Supreme Court review

In a major victory for affirmative action, a divided Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the University of Texas admissions program that takes account of race. The justices voted in favor of the Texas program by a 4-3 vote, an outcome that was dramatically altered by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, who opposed affirmative action.

Supreme Court upholds University of Texas affirmative action plan

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the race-conscious admissions program at the University of Texas, saying that the plan taking race into consideration as one factor of admission is constitutional. "The Court's affirmance of the University's admissions policy today does not necessarily mean the University may rely on that same policy without refinement.

Supreme Court upholds University of Texas affirmative action plan

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the race-conscious admissions program at the University of Texas, saying that the plan taking race into consideration as one factor of admission is constitutional. "The Court's affirmance of the University's admissions policy today does not necessarily mean the University may rely on that same policy without refinement.

Advocates of affirmative action policies at colleges

Supreme Court upholds affirmative action program Narrow decision allows use of racial preferences at University of Texas Check out this story on eveningsun.com: http://usat.ly/28P5Qgg Advocates of affirmative action policies at colleges and universities rallied outside the Supreme Court in December when the University of Texas case was heard. WASHINGTON - A deeply divided Supreme Court upheld the use of racial preferences in admissions at the University of Texas Thursday, giving an unexpected reprieve to the type of affirmative action policies it has condoned for nearly four decades.

Juvenile lifers await chance for parole after US ruling

To continue reading up to 10 premium articles, you must register , or sign up and take advantage of this exclusive offer: Jackie Lee Thompson poses for a portrait Tuesday June 7, 2016 near Wellsboro, Pa. Thompson, 61, appears to be the first of Pennsylvania's approximately 500 juvenile lifers released since the Supreme Court ruling in January.

Juvenile lifers await chance for parole after US ruling

It's been six months since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that some 2,500 "juvenile lifers" could seek a chance at parole for their childhood crimes, but only a few aging inmates have walked out of prison. Public defenders fear many will need the blessing of a judge, a parole board and perhaps the victim's family, even after Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that only the "rarest of children" are so "incorrigible" they should never go free.

6/19/2016

It's hard to imagine. But it sure would be poetic justice if "The Roberts Court" ended up with Roberts and Alito huddled in their own little corner as the last remnants of the Reagan Revolution.

One glance at your phone is enough to taint a jury

Can a judge call back a jury to start over, even after they've been dismissed? Ancient tradition said no, viewing the verdict as a kind of magical or divine pronouncement. Thursday, the Supreme Court broke the spell and said yes, it can happen -- but only if jurors haven't checked their phones yet.

High court sides with property owners in wetlands case

The Supreme Court is making it easier for landowners to bring a court challenge when federal regulators try to restrict property development due to concerns about water pollution. The justices ruled unanimously Tuesday that a Minnesota company could file a lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over the agency's determination that its land is off limits to peat mining under the Clean Water Act.

Gay marriage victory at Supreme Court triggering backlash

Gay marriage victory at Supreme Court triggering backlash Transgender rights, religious exemptions represent next wave of legal battle Check out this story on pressconnects.com: http://usat.ly/1TObkL8 Protesters rally in April against a North Carolina law that restricts LGBT rights, including the use of public restrooms by transgender people. WASHINGTON - When the Supreme Court declared a constitutional right to same-sex marriage last June, the man who won the leading case warned that opponents would find new ways to push back.