New contact detected in search for vanished Argentine submarine

The US Navy's research vessel Atlantis deploys the cable-controlled Undersea Recovery Vehicle off the coast of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, as part of the search for the missing San Juan submarine AFP/HO BUENOS AIRES: A sonar search for the Argentine submarine that disappeared on Nov 15 with 44 crew members on board has made a new contact in the South Atlantic, according to the navy. It will be investigated by the remotely-operated Russian Panther Plus submarine, while the US oceanographic research vessel Atlantis continues exploring the search area, the navy announced Saturday.

Wednesday November 29, Our World in Pictures

Still no Submarine: Spokesman Enrique Balbi talks during a press conference at Navy headquarters in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tuesday. There have been no signs of the missing ARA San Juan, last heard from on Nov. 15., despite an intensive multinational search.

Argentine navy hopeful of submarine survivors

Buenos Aires [Argentina], Nov 27: The Argentine navy is clinging to hope that 44 crew members aboard the missing submarine could be alive. The passage of time doesn't rule out "a situation of extreme survival," Fox News reported, citing Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi, as saying.

Argentine navy hopeful of submarine survivors

Buenos Aires [Argentina], Nov 27: The Argentine navy is clinging to hope that 44 crew members aboard the missing submarine could be alive. The passage of time doesn't rule out "a situation of extreme survival," Fox News reported, citing Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi, as saying.

Argentine navy hopeful of submarine survivors

Buenos Aires [Argentina], Nov 27: The Argentine navy is clinging to hope that 44 crew members aboard the missing submarine could be alive. The passage of time doesn't rule out "a situation of extreme survival," Fox News reported, citing Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi, as saying.

Argentine navy not giving up search for sub after ‘explosion’ report

The Argentine navy says it's not ready to give up a search for a vanished submarine, after the military revealed a sound consistent with an explosion was detected near the vessel's last known location last week off the country's South Atlantic coast. "Unfortunately, we still haven't been able to locate the San Juan submarine despite all of our efforts in the area of operations," Argentine navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters Saturday in Buenos Aires.

Argentina: Search for missing sub accelerates despite blast

The round-the-clock international search for a submarine that has been lost in the South Atlantic for nine days is accelerating amid growing fears for its 44 crew members. The Argentine navy says an explosion occurred near the time and place where the sub went missing on Nov. 15. That's led some family members of the crew to give up hope of a rescue.

Hope fades after report of a explosiona heard at time Argentine sub went missing

MAR DEL PLATA , Argentina - An apparent explosion occurred near the time and place an Argentine submarine went missing, the country's navy reported Thursday an ominous development that prompted relatives of the 44 crew members to burst into tears, and some to say they had lost all hope of rescue. Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi said the search will continue until there is full certainty about the fate of the ARA San Juan.

Sound heard in search for missing submarine consistent with explosion

Argentina's navy has announced that a sound detected during the search for a missing submarine is consistent with that of an explosion - an ominous development in the hunt for the vessel and its 44 crew members. Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi said that the relatives of the crew have been informed and that the search will continue until there is full certainty about the fate of the ARA San Juan.

Sound heard in search for missing submarine consistent with explosion

Argentina's navy has announced that a sound detected during the search for a missing submarine is consistent with that of an explosion - an ominous development in the hunt for the vessel and its 44 crew members. Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi said that the relatives of the crew have been informed and that the search will continue until there is full certainty about the fate of the ARA San Juan.

The Latest: ‘Explosion” raises fears for Argentine sub

La policA a y los soldados forman un cA rculo de protecciA3n alrededor de los familiares angustiados del tripulante Celso Oscar Vallejo del submarino argentino desaparecido mientras son escoltados a la base naval de Mar de Plata, en Argentina, el jueves 23 de noviembre de 2017. People pray for the crew of the missing submarine outside the navy base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017.

The Latest: ‘Explosion” raises fears for Argentine sub

La policA a y los soldados forman un cA rculo de protecciA3n alrededor de los familiares angustiados del tripulante Celso Oscar Vallejo del submarino argentino desaparecido mientras son escoltados a la base naval de Mar de Plata, en Argentina, el jueves 23 de noviembre de 2017. People pray for the crew of the missing submarine outside the navy base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017.

Sound heard in Argentine sub search could be explosion

Argentina's navy announced Thursday that a sound detected during the search for a missing submarine is consistent with that of an explosion - an ominous development in the hunt for the vessel and its 44 crew members. Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi said that the relatives of the crew have been informed and that the search will continue until there is full certainty about the fate of the ARA San Juan.

Argentina reports new clue in search for missing submarine

In this Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017 photo released by the Argentine Navy on Nov. 22, members of the Argentine Air Force search for a missing submarine in the South Atlantic near Argentina's coast. Argentine families of 44 crew members aboard a submarine that has been lost in the South Atlantic for seven days are growing increasingly distressed as experts say the crew might be reaching a critical period of low oxygen on Wednesday.

Widening search finds no sign of missing Argentine submarine


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A U.S. aircraft searching for a missing Argentine submarine with 44 crew members spotted white flares, but they were unlikely to be from the sub lost for six days in the South Atlantic, the Argentine navy said Tuesday. The ARA San Juan carried red and green flares, but authorities would still try to identify the origin of the white signals, navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters.

School teachers hang a sign with the colours of the Argentine flag that reads in Spanish

School teachers hang a sign with the colours of the Argentine flag that reads in Spanish "ARA San Juan, we wait for you" on a fence at the Navel base in Mar del Plata, Argentina Sounds detected by probes deep in the South Atlantic did not come from an Argentine submarine that has been lost for five days, the country's navy said, dashing newfound hope among relatives of the 44 sailors aboard. Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters that the "noise" was analysed and experts determined it was likely "biological".

Argentina says calls did not come from missing submarine

Argentina's navy says that brief satellite calls that had raised hopes of finding a missing submarine did not come from its 44 crew members on board. Authorities last had contact with the ARA San Juan sub on Wednesday as it journeyed from the extreme southern port of Ushuaia to the coastal city of Mar del Plata.

Argentina’s missing submarine: What we know

Efforts to locate an Argentine submarine that has been missing since last week have been ramped up dramatically by a multinational search team of boats and planes, the country's navy says. "We have tripled the search effort, both on the surface and underwater, with 10 airplanes," said Gabriel Galeazzi, a spokesman from the Mar Del Plata Argentine naval base.

Argentina can’t be sure satellite calls came from lost submarine amid search

Comandante Espora Argentine sails from the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, to join the search for a missing submarine Argentina's Navy cannot confirm whether seven brief satellite calls received the day before were from a lost submarine with 44 crew members on board. "We do not have clear evidence that have come from that unit," said Admiral Gabriel Gonzalez, chief of the Mar del Plata Naval Base.

Rescuers battle waves, wind in hunt for missing Argentine submarine

The ARA San Juan, shown in a photo released by the Argentine navy, has been missing for days with 44 crew members aboard. BUENOS AIRES: A multinational armada of aircraft and vessels battled high winds and giant waves on Sunday as they intensified their search for a missing Argentine submarine, after attempted distress calls raised hopes the 44 crew members may still be alive.

Royal Navy deploys patrol ship to search for Argentine sub

Royal Navy deploys polar patrol ship to search for Argentine submarine and its 44 crew that vanished three days ago during voyage near the Falklands The Royal Navy has deployed an ice patrol ship to help search for a missing Argentinian submarine with 44 crew members on board. Britain sent the HSM Protector, a polar exploration vessel, to the southern Argentine Sea to assist in searches for the military sub ARA San Juan, which lost contact with officials three days ago.

Missing Argentine submarine may have attempted contact 7 times

Argentina's Navy detected seven brief satellite calls Saturday that officials believe may have come from a submarine with 44 crew members that hadn't been heard from in three days. The communication attempts "indicate that the crew is trying to re-establish contact, so we are working to locate the source of the emissions," the Navy said on its Twitter account, adding that the calls lasted between four and 36 seconds.

Argentina says it may have received signals from missing sub

Argentina's Navy detected seven brief satellite calls late Saturday that officials believe may have come from a submarine with 44 crew members that hadn't been heard from in three days. The communication attempts "indicate that the crew is trying to re-establish contact, so we are working to locate the source of the emissions," the Navy said on its Twitter account.

US Navy to Deploy Undersea Rescue Capabilities to Argentina

The U.S. Navy has ordered its Undersea Rescue Command based in San Diego to deploy to Argentina Nov. 18, to support the South American nation's ongoing search for the Argentinean Navy submarine A.R.A. San Juan in the Southern Atlantic. URC is deploying two independent rescue assets based on a number of factors, including the varying depth of ocean waters near South America's southeastern coast and the differing safe operating depths of the two rescue systems.

Sign missing submarine is not lost

THERE are hopes 44 crew members aboard an Argentine submarine that disappeared three days ago may still be alive, according to the Navy. This ship is part of a searching crew to find a submarine that hadn't been heard from in three days.

Argentina says signals detected, likely from missing submarine

The Argentine military submarine ARA San Juan and crew are seen leaving the port of Buenos Aires, Argentina June 2, 2014. Armada Argentina/Handout via REUTERS/Files The 44 crew members of a missing Argentina navy submarine may be found alive rose after the defense ministry said the vessel likely tried to communicate via satellite on Saturday as an international search mission was underway in the stormy South Atlantic.

.com | Argentina steps up search for missing submarine

Buenos Aires - Argentina's Navy said on Saturday that it was ramping up the search for a submarine that hadn't been heard from in three days and at least six other nations said they would join in the effort. Navy spokesperson Enrique Balbi said that the area being searched off the country's southern Atlantic coast has been doubled as concerns about the 44 crew members grew.

.com | Argentina steps up search for missing submarine

Buenos Aires - Argentina's Navy said on Saturday that it was ramping up the search for a submarine that hadn't been heard from in three days and at least six other nations said they would join in the effort. Navy spokesperson Enrique Balbi said that the area being searched off the country's southern Atlantic coast has been doubled as concerns about the 44 crew members grew.

A submarine has vanished, launching a frantic search for 44 people on board

Argentine authorities are scrambling to find a three-decade-old submarine that suddenly stopped communicating during a routine mission Wednesday - an emergency authorities say could range from a fried electrical system to something much worse. The diesel-electric ARA San Juan was returning to its base south of Buenos Aires after a routine mission to Ushuaia, near the southern tip of South America.

A submarine has vanished, launching a frantic search for 44 people on board

Argentine authorities are scrambling to find a three-decade-old submarine that suddenly stopped communicating during a routine mission Wednesday - an emergency authorities say could range from a fried electrical system to something much worse. The diesel-electric ARA San Juan was returning to its base south of Buenos Aires after a routine mission to Ushuaia, near the southern tip of South America.

Argentina’s ‘stolen babies’ seek truth, face ghosts

This June 6, 2016 photo shows a poster displaying stolen babies as part of a systematic state-sponsored plan during Argentina's 1976-1983 dictatorship, and pictures of youth recovered, on a wall at the headquarters of the ... . In this May 4, 2016 photo, Guillermo Perez Roisinblit, stolen as a baby, poses for a picture in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

30 years ago scientists warned Congress on global warming. What they said sounds eerily familiar

Pieces of ice fall from the front of Argentina's Perito Moreno glacier near the city of El Calafate, in the Patagonian province of Santa Cruz, in this file photo. REUTERS/MARCOS BRINDICCI Thirty years ago, on June 10 and 11 of 1986, the U.S. Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works commenced two days of hearings, convened by Sen. John H. Chafee, R-Rhode Island, on the subject of "Ozone Depletion, the Greenhouse Effect, and Climate Change."