Getting Arkansas data can be challenging

Government secrecy was a big winner in Arkansas during 2017, but not by a shutout. Lawmakers granted wide-ranging secrecy to schools, universities and the state Capitol police, and as the end of the year approached the Legislature wouldn't talk about a past harassment complaint involving a legislator.

Medicinal pot advice OK at VA but no Rxs

Once Arkansas allows medical marijuana sales, veterans in the care of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs physicians can discuss the drug with their doctors, but that's it. In the federal government's eyes, marijuana is an illegal, Schedule 1 controlled substance, meaning the VA won't recommend, prescribe or pay for cannabis.

Planned Parenthood asks Supreme Court to restore injunction on medical abortion

Planned Parenthood Great Plains today asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review and correct the 8th Circuit Court of Appeal's July ruling that would allow the state to effectively ban the safest abortion procedure - the administration of drugs that would trigger miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy. At issue is Arkansas's Act 557 of 2015, which requires physicians who provide medical abortion - including Arkansas's two Planned Parenthood Clinics and Little Rock Family Planning Services - to contract with a second physician with hospital privileges.

Planned Parenthood asks Supreme Court to restore injunction on medical abortion

Planned Parenthood Great Plains today asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review and correct the 8th Circuit Court of Appeal's July ruling that would allow the state to effectively ban the safest abortion procedure - the administration of drugs that would trigger miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy. At issue is Arkansas's Act 557 of 2015, which requires physicians who provide medical abortion - including Arkansas's two Planned Parenthood Clinics and Little Rock Family Planning Services - to contract with a second physician with hospital privileges.

A Birth Certificate is a Person’s First Possession


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A recent controversy over birth certificates in Arkansas demonstrates that these slips of paper are imbued with political and social meaning. In 2015, a married couple, Marisa and Terrah Pavan, had their first child , who was conceived through sperm donation.

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An Arkansas judge on Friday blocked the state from issuing any birth certificates until officials are able to comply with a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the state's birth certificate law illegally favors heterosexual parents. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Tim Fox on Friday set aside his orders requiring the state and three same-sex couples go into mediation on how to fix the state law to comply with the U.S. high court's order.

Filing defends laws on abortion

A federal judge's July 28 order blocking the enforcement of four abortion-restricting laws enacted this year by the Arkansas General Assembly should be reversed, attorneys for the state have argued in a 59-page brief filed at the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis. a Act 45, which would have taken effect July 30 and bans a common second-trimester procedure, dilation and evacuation, that supporters of the law have called "particularly barbaric" but foes say is the safest second-trimester abortion method available in outpatient facilities.

Arkansas court grants inmate’s bid to halt execution

In this on Oct. 4, 2017, frame grab from video, Arkansas death row inmate Jack Greene appears before the state parole board at a prison in Varner, Ark. Greene is scheduled to die Nov. 9, 2017, but his lawyers are arguing that he is severely mentally ill and that, as a result of that, he sticks strands of tissue into his ears and nose to the point that they become bloody.

Look whoa s talking: Ita s President Donald Trump a ” again

By CATHERINE LUCEY and KEN THOMAS, Associated Press WASHINGTON - Reporters were seated in the White House briefing room awaiting an appearance by press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday when a call went out over a loudspeaker to head to the Rose Garden. There was no time to lose: President Donald Trump wanted to talk.

In the Abuser’s House #3


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The violence of the day appears to be coming to an end. But not before one woman died in the car attack on anti-racist counter-protestors which left many others wounded - some with injuries that appear life-threatening.

Arkansas governor: Changes needed to Senate health care bill

John Hatcher, right, and Ethan Williams, both of Jonesboro, hold up signs for passing motorists while protesting the healthcare bill in front of the Municipal Center Thursday, June 29, 2017, in Jonesboro, Ark. The U.S. Senate GOP's stalled health care legislation needs to ease some of its limits on Medicaid spending and give greater control of the program to the states, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said Thursday.

2 Arkansas men set to be executed want stays for poor health

This combination of undated file photos provided by the Arkansas Department of Correction shows death-row inmates Jack Jones, left, and Marcel Williams. The two Arkansas inmates scheduled to be put to death Monday, April 24, 2017, in what could be the nation's first double execution in more than 16 years have asked an appeals court to halt their lethal injections because of poor health.

Federal judge issues injunction to block Arkansas executions

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen issued a temporary restraining order stopping the state from using the drug of vecuronium bromide for lethal injections. "We are calling on state officials to accept the federal court's decision, cancel the frantic execution schedule, and propose a legal and humane method to carry out its executions".

Stephen Colbert and ‘Stephen Colbert’ bid farewell to Bill O’Reilly

The removal of conservative commentator Bill O'Reilly from his top-rated Fox News show over allegations of sexual harassment "is an important next step to clean up Fox News and make it a respectful and professional work environment", says the attorney representing Gretchen Carlson in her harassment case against Roger Ailes-the network's founding President who left the company a year ago in a scenario that mirrors O'Reilly's departure. Fox News Channel announced Wednesday O'Reilly has immediately departed the network.

The Latest: Judge won’t block Arkansas executions

In this Tuesday, April 18, 2017 file photo, Ledell Lee appears in Pulaski County Circuit Court for a hearing in which lawyers argued to stop his execution which is scheduled for Thursday. Unless a court steps in, Lee and Stacey Johnson are set for execution Thursday night.

Arkansas executes inmate after U.S. Supreme Court gives go-ahead

Arkansas executed its first inmate in 12 years on Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the inmate's request to halt the lethal injection in a late-night ruling. Ledell Lee, 51, was the first to be put to death out of a group of eight men that Arkansas originally planned to execute within a span of 11 days, before the expiration of one of the drugs the state uses for the lethal injection.

Arkansas conducts first execution since 2005, plans 3 more

Solomon Graves, a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Correction, waits at a desk behind an Arkansas flag for a telephone call with news from the death chamber at the Cummins Unit prison on Thursday, April 20, 2017. The U.S. Supreme Court rejected stay requests from Ledell Lee, allowing his execution to proceed at the prison near Varner, Ark.

Arkansas looks to carry out 1st execution since 2005

In this Monday evening, April 17, 2017 photo, the sun sets behind clouds over an Arkansas State Police command post outside the Varner Unit of the Arkansas Department of Correction near Varner, Ark. As state officials prepare to carry out a double execution Thursday ahead of a drug expiration deadline and despite the setback the U.S. Supreme Court delivered late Monday, lawyers for those condemned men look to be taking a different approach: claiming the prisoners are actually innocent.

Arkansas determined to fight legal challenges to executions

Arkansas has said it will appeal a court ruling that bars the U.S. state's use of a lethal injection drug and effectively puts a stop to its plans to execute eight prisoners in 11 days. A state circuit judge issued the temporary restraining order on Wednesday after the U.S. pharmaceutical firm McKesson Medical-Surgical Inc accused the state of obtaining the muscle relaxant vecuronium bromide under false pretences.

The Latest: Arkansas governor disappointed by court ruling

In this Monday evening, April 17, 2017 photo, the sun sets behind clouds over an Arkansas State Police command post outside the Varner Unit of the Arkansas Department of Correction near Varner, Ark. As state officials prepare to carry out a double execution Thursday ahead of a drug expiration deadline and despite the setback the U.S. Supreme Court delivered late Monday, lawyers for those condemned men look to be taking a different approach: claiming the prisoners are actually innocent.

The Latest: Arkansas inmates petition US Supreme Court

In this Monday evening, April 17, 2017 photo, the sun sets behind clouds over an Arkansas State Police command post outside the Varner Unit of the Arkansas Department of Correction near Varner, Ark. As state officials prepare to carry out a double execution Thursday ahead of a drug expiration deadline and despite the setback the U.S. Supreme Court delivered late Monday, lawyers for those condemned men look to be taking a different approach: claiming the prisoners are actually innocent.

US Supreme Court spares Arkansas inmate from execution

People gather at a rally opposing the state's upcoming executions, on the front steps of Arkansas' Capitol, Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark. Protesters gather outside the state Capitol building on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark., to voice their opposition to Arkansas' seven upcoming executions.

The Latest: Lawyers: Don’t rush Arkansas executions decision

People gather at a rally opposing the state's upcoming executions, on the front steps of Arkansas' Capitol, Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark. less People gather at a rally opposing the state's upcoming executions, on the front steps of Arkansas' Capitol, Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark.

Arkansas governor says execution plan just part of the job

Protesters gather outside the state Capitol building on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark., to voice their opposition to Arkansas' seven upcoming executions. Actor Johnny Depp greets someone as he walks to the podium to speak at a rally opposing Arkansas' upcoming executions, which are set to begin next week, on the front steps of the Capitol Friday, April 14, 2017, in Little Rock, Ark.

Huckabee: North Korean Leader ‘Seriously Crazy’

Former Gov. Mike Huckabee called North Korean leader Kim Jong-un "seriously crazy" and a threat to the "entire planet." In remarks Saturday night on Fox News' "Justice with Judge Jeanine," the Arkansas Republican and minister said Kim "thinks in the terms of publicity and showing off."

Judge halts Arkansas plan to execute 8 inmates in 11 days

A federal judge dealt another blow Saturday to Arkansas' unprecedented plan to execute eight inmates in an 11-day period, saying the men have the right to challenge a drug protocol that could expose them to "severe pain." The state still hopes to begin the executions Monday and the attorney general's office promised an appeal to overturn U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker's order.

Accelerated executions: Arkansas plans 8 over 10-day period

After nearly a dozen years without an execution, Arkansas is racing to put eight men to death next month over a 10-day period - an unprecedented timetable the state says is necessary because one of the three ingredients in the lethal injection will soon expire. If carried out, the executions beginning April 17 would make Arkansas the first state to execute that many inmates in such a short time since the death penalty was reinstated by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders is a rising star in Trump’s orbit

Faced with aggressive on-air questioning about the president's wiretapping claims, Sarah Huckabee Sanders didn't flinch, she went folksy. Speaking to George Stephanopoulos on "Good Morning America," she pulled out a version of an old line from President Lyndon Johnson: "If the president walked across the Potomac, the media would be reporting that he could not swim."

Naming airport after Clintons doesn’t fly with GOP lawmaker

In this May 3, 2013, file photo, former President Bill Clinton speaks at ceremonies in Little Rock, Ark., to dedicate the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport. With his party now holding all of the levers of power in Arkansas politics, Sen. Jason Rapert, a Republican state lawmaker, is pushing to remove the names of the state's most famous Democrats _ Bill and Hillary Clinton _ from Little Rock's airport.

Naming airport after Clintons doesn’t fly with GOP lawmaker

In this May 3, 2013, file photo, former President Bill Clinton speaks at ceremonies in Little Rock, Ark., to dedicate the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport. With his party now holding all of the levers of power in Arkansas politics, Sen. Jason Rapert, a Republican state lawmaker, is pushing to remove the names of the state's most famous Democrats _ Bill and Hillary Clinton _ from Little Rock's airport.

Amazon to collect taxes on state sales

Seattle-based Amazon on March 1 will begin collecting taxes on its sales to Arkansans and paying those taxes to the state government, Amazon spokesman Jill Kerr said Friday. Amazon's announcement came four days after the Arkansas Senate voted 23-9 to approve legislation aimed at persuading Amazon and some other companies that have no physical presence in Arkansas to collect taxes on their sales and remit the receipts to the state.

Huckabee: UN Trying to Push Israel Into a ‘Suicide Pact’

With its resolution on Israel, the United Nations is attempting to push Israel into "accepting borders that would essentially be a suicide pact," and the Obama administration was most likely behind the vote, former Gov. Mike Huckabee said Tuesday. "Silence is agreement, and by the U.S. being silent and abstaining [from the vote], they did agree to it, and I think they helped orchestrate it," Huckabee, a strong advocate of Israel, told Fox News' "Fox & Friends" program.

Did Trump pass over Huckabee, as he did Giuliani and Christie?

NO FIT: How Huckabee described the outcome of his talk with Donald Trump about a potential role in his administration. The Wall Street Journal says people are taking note that some Donald Trump loyalists, who defended him in the dark hours after the release of the pussy-grabbing comment on video, haven't landed spots yet in his administration.

Arkansas cards against Clinton

Despite her last name and her long ties to the state, White House hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton found few allies in Arkansas on Tuesday. Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, won in eight of the state's 75 counties, capturing just 33.7 percent of the vote.

Huckabee says ‘Trump’s gotta be Trump’ in final weeks of campaign

Former presidential candidate and Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Monday on "The Kelly File" that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump should resist calls to shift his messaging in the final weeks of the campaign. In the wake of the New York Times report containing an IRS filing that showed Trump used the U.S. tax code to take a nearly $1 billion operating loss in 1995 and may not have had to pay federal taxes for 18 years, Huckabee said that Trump's supporters "don't care what the media says."

DNC Day 3: Where it all began

In advance of Wednesday's packed convention activities - perhaps the most content-heavy convention night I can remember across my four decades watching conventions - the Arkansans delegation spent a little time with Bill Clinton at a reception called "Where It All Began." The name of the party - held at the WHYY-FM public radio building, a snazzy space near Independence Hall - was a double entendre for Philadelphia's role as the birthplace of American democracy and Arkansas's role in fostering Hillary Clinton's public service work.

Huckabee opts for Fox over convention speech

Former Gov. Mike Huckabee won't be speaking at the Republican National Convention this week, opting instead to appear on Fox News as a political contributor. Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, had invited his former rival to address the delegates, but the network told Huckabee he'd have to choose between the news set and the convention stage.

Huckabee paying $25,000 for ‘Eye of the Tiger’

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee's presidential campaign has agreed to pay $25,000 to settle a lawsuit for using a 1980s rock anthem, "Eye of the Tiger," without the permission of the music's owner, CNN Money said this week. Terms of the settlement between the campaign and Rude Music Inc. are confidential, but details have emerged in recent Federal Election Commission filings.

Eldridge criticizes Boozman’s votes on gun control bills

Democratic U.S. Senate hopeful Conner Eldridge criticized Republican Sen. John Boozman Wednesday for opposing an effort to prevent terrorists from buying guns, saying an alternative measure backed by the Arkansas lawmaker doesn't go far enough. Speaking to the Political Animals Club, Eldridge said he supports a proposal by Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein that would let the federal government block many gun sales to known or suspected terrorists.

Maintenance work to force lane closures over Bull Shoals Dam

Maintenance work on Arkansas 178 at the Bull Shoals Dam in Baxter County will require lane closures beginning next month. The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department says all lanes of the Arkansas 178 bridge will be closed on June 6 and June 7 as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers performs maintenance work.

$1.4M aids study of obesity in state

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded a $1.4 million grant for scientists to study why obesity rates in Arkansas are among the highest in the country. The grant from the USDA's Agricultural Research Service was awarded to the Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.