Government seeks change to order lifting Trump refugee ban

Lawyers with the Department of Justice have asked a federal judge to change his order that partially lifted a Trump administration refugee ban. Just before Christmas, U.S. District Judge James Robart in Seattle imposed a nationwide injunction that blocks restrictions on reuniting refugee families and partially lifted a ban on refugees from 11 mostly Muslim countries.

Government seeks change to order lifting Trump refugee ban

Lawyers with the Department of Justice have asked a federal judge to change his order that partially lifted a Trump administration refugee ban. Just before Christmas, U.S. District Judge James Robart in Seattle imposed a nationwide injunction that blocks restrictions on reuniting refugee families and partially lifted a ban on refugees from 11 mostly Muslim countries.

Federal Judge Partially Lifts Trump Administration Ban on Refugees


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A federal judge in Seattle on Saturday partially lifted a Trump administration ban on certain refugees after two groups argued that the policy prevented people from some mostly Muslim countries from reuniting with family living legally in the United States. U.S. District Judge James Robart heard arguments Thursday in lawsuits from the American Civil Liberties Union and Jewish Family Service, which say the ban causes irreparable harm and puts some people at risk.

Judge partly lifts travel ban for families of certain refugees

A federal judge in Seattle on Saturday partially lifted a Trump administration ban on certain refugees after two groups argued that the policy prevented people from some mostly Muslim countries from reuniting with relatives living legally in the United States. U.S. District Judge James Robart heard arguments Thursday in lawsuits from the American Civil Liberties Union and Jewish Family Service, which say the ban causes irreparable harm and puts some people at risk.

Correction: Travel Ban-Refugees story

Mariko Hirose, right, a litigation director at the Urban Justice Center, Esther Sung, a staff attorney at the National Immigration Law Center, Rabbi Will Berkowitz, Jewish Family Service of Seattle CEO and Mark Hetfield, pre... . Tana Lin, an ACLU attorney, speaks with media members in front of a federal courthouse Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, in Seattle.

Justices hearing dispute over wedding cake for gay couple

The Supreme Court is taking up the highly anticipated case of the Colorado baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. Tuesday's clash at the high court pits baker Jack Phillips' First Amendment claims of artistic freedom against the anti-discrimination arguments of the Colorado Civil Rights Commission, and two men Phillips turned away in 2012.

Q&A: ACLU’s Wessler on the SCOTUS Cell-Site Data Case

Nathan Wessler, staff attorney with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will hear arguments on the limits of privacy in an age where we all carry around devices capable of tracking our location. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will hear arguments on the limits of privacy in an age where we all carry around devices capable of tracking our location.

Government Releases 10-Year-Old Rosa Maria Hernandez After ACLU Files …

Trump Campaign Adviser Met With Russian Officials in 2016 - WASHINGTON - Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser to the Trump presidential campaign, met Russian government officials during a July 2016 trip he took to Moscow, according to testimony he gave on Thursday to the House Intelligence Committee. Longtime Trump bodyguard to face questions about 2013 Moscow trip - One of President Trump's most trusted confidants, a security chief who served as his sounding board for two decades, will face questions from congressional investigators next week about Trump's 2013 trip to Moscow, according to people familiar with their plans.

10-year-old immigrant with cerebral palsy released

U.S. authorities on Friday released a 10-year-old immigrant girl with cerebral palsy who had been detained by border agents after surgery because she is in the U.S. without legal permission. The ACLU and U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro said in statements that Rosa Maria Hernandez was returned Friday afternoon to her family.

U.S. government releases detained Mexican girl with cerebral palsy

The U.S. government released from custody a 10-year-old Mexican girl with cerebral palsy on Friday, the American Civil Liberties Union said, 10 days after the ambulance taking her to surgery in Texas was stopped at a U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint. Rosa Maria Hernandez has lived in the United States illegally since her family brought over the border to Texas when she was 3 months old.

Legal help sought for Indonesian immigration cases

As the court battle that would allow local Indonesians a chance to re-open their immigration cases continues, the American Civil Liberties Union is looking for a few good attorneys. The ACLU and Nixon Peabody LLP are currently litigating a federal habeas class action in Boston that asks the district court to stay the removal of about 70 Indonesian Christians.

Federal judge blasts Trump administration attempts to deny abortion for pregnant, undocumented teen

A federal judge said Wednesday that she was "astounded" the U.S. government is blocking a detained Central American teenager from terminating her pregnancy, during a fiery court hearing that showcased Trump administration efforts to restrict abortion and illegal immigration. After a brief hearing that included a testy exchange with government lawyers, Judge Tanya Chutkan ordered the government to move "promptly and without delay" to transport the 17-year-old girl or allow her to be transported by others to the nearest abortion provider.

Federal judge blasts Trump administration attempts to deny abortion for pregnant, undocumented teen

A federal judge said Wednesday that she was "astounded" the U.S. government is blocking a detained Central American teenager from terminating her pregnancy, during a fiery court hearing that showcased Trump administration efforts to restrict abortion and illegal immigration. After a brief hearing that included a testy exchange with government lawyers, Judge Tanya Chutkan ordered the government to move "promptly and without delay" to transport the 17-year-old girl or allow her to be transported by others to the nearest abortion provider.

Citing religious freedom, Trump backing off Obama-era rules

In a one-two punch elating religious conservatives, President Donald Trump's administration is allowing more employers to opt out of no-cost birth control for workers and issuing sweeping religious-freedom directions that could override many anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people and others. At a time when Trump finds himself embattled on many fronts, the two directives - issued almost simultaneously on Friday - demonstrated the president's eagerness to retain the loyalty of social conservatives who make up a key part of his base.

Citing religious freedom, Trump backing off Obama-era rules

In a one-two punch elating religious conservatives, President Donald Trump's administration is allowing more employers to opt out of no-cost birth control for workers and issuing sweeping religious-freedom directions that could override many anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people and others. At a time when Trump finds himself embattled on many fronts, the two directives - issued almost simultaneously on Friday - demonstrated the president's eagerness to retain the loyalty of social conservatives who make up a key part of his base.

Trump hits birth control, LGBT rights

In a one-two punch elating religious conservatives, President Donald Trump's administration is allowing more employers to opt out of no-cost birth control for workers and issuing sweeping religious-freedom directions that could override many anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people and others. At a time when Trump finds himself embattled on many fronts, the two directives - issued almost simultaneously on Friday - demonstrated the president's eagerness to retain the loyalty of social conservatives who make up a key part of his base.

Trump’s one-two punch hits birth control, LGBT rights

In a one-two punch elating religious conservatives, President Donald Trump's administration is allowing more employers to opt out of no-cost birth control for workers and issuing sweeping religious-freedom directions that could override many anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people and others. At a time when Trump finds himself embattled on many fronts, the two directives - issued almost simultaneously on Friday - demonstrated the president's eagerness to retain the loyalty of social conservatives who make up a key part of his base.

The nation in brief

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging federal restrictions that limit many women's access to a pill that can induce abortion in the early weeks of a pregnancy. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Hawaii, targets long-standing restrictions imposed by the Food and Drug Administration that say the pill, marketed in the U.S. as Mifeprex, can be dispensed only in clinics, hospitals and doctors' offices.

ACLU dances on the grave of Henry Hyde – thanks to Republican Gov. Rauner


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Despite his campaign rhetoric, Bruce Rauner may go down in history as one of Illinois' most socially and culturally transformative governors. He'll certainly be listed among the most effective for the Democrat, progressive left.

Feds demand Facebook handover private info of ‘anti-administrationa

The Department of Justice is demanding that Facebook provide the government with the private information of three users, including the identities of an estimated 6,000 people who "liked" a page set up in protest of President Donald Trump. In search warrants filed in court , government officials sought the disclosure of a wide swath of personal information from the Facebook accounts of two political activists and a page set up to coordinate protests of Trump on Inauguration Day.

Texas asks court to allow ‘sanctuary cities’ ban

With immigrants and their advocates chanting and beating drums outside, a federal appeals court heard arguments Friday on whether it should allow a Texas law aimed at combatting "sanctuary cities" to immediately take effect. Under the law, Texas police chiefs could face removal from office and criminal charges for not complying with federal immigration officials' requests to detain people jailed on non-immigration offenses.

Justice Ginsburg Promises a ‘Momentous’ Supreme Court Term


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With the U.S. Supreme Court set to open Oct. 2, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is warming up the crowd. Speaking at Georgetown Law, she promised it will be a "momentous" term with issues such as the President's travel ban, religious freedom, voting rights, and same-sex marriage.

Roy Moore’s defiant road to become US senator

In his nearly three decades in the public eye, Roy Moore has never been one to shy away from controversy or confrontation. Whether it's the public display of the Ten Commandments or his refusal to enforce the U.S. Supreme Court's legalization of same-sex marriage, Moore has gained national attention for his dogged and bombastic defense of his brand of Christianity's role in the American political system.

ACLU, DOJ settle legal challenge against Trump travel ban

The legal challenge launched by the American Civil Liberties Union against President Trump's first travel ban has finally been settled - but the terms have not been disclosed. Attorneys for both the ACLU and the Department of Justice agreed on an undisclosed deal Thursday after holding closed-door discussions for months , according to court documents.

President Trump pardons former Sheriff Joe Arpaio

President Donald Trump has pardoned controversial former sheriff Joe Arpaio of his conviction for criminal contempt, the White House said Friday night. Arpaio, who was a sheriff in Maricopa County, Arizona, was found guilty of criminal contempt last month for disregarding a court order in a racial profiling case.

The Latest: Phoenix police explain injuries to arrested man


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The ACLU of Arizona says Phoenix police used excessive crowd-control methods after a protest turned unruly following a rally by President Donald Trump on Tuesday. The protest against Trump drew thousands and was mostly peaceful until after the rally ended and the crowds were thinning out.

The Latest: US defends gang-related immigrant detentions

" The Latest on a lawsuit that says teenagers accused of gang affiliations are being illegally detained : A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Justice is defending the detention of immigrant teenagers over allegations of gang affiliation. The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Friday claiming some teens who entered the United States under the unaccompanied-children program are being illegally detained.

Free-speech debate swirls as officials block on social media

An emerging debate about whether elected officials violate people's free speech rights by blocking them on social media is spreading across the U.S. as groups sue or warn politicians to stop the practice. The American Civil Liberties Union this week sued Maine Gov. Paul LePage and sent warning letters to Utah's congressional delegation.

Trump administration sides with Ohio on purging voter rolls

President Donald Trump's administration has reversed the government's position on a voter roll case before the U.S. Supreme Court and is now backing Ohio's method for purging voters. Ohio's system for removing inactive voters from the rolls does not violate the National Voter Registration Act, the Justice Department said Monday.

Threat to free speech

There is a Senate bill, along with a companion bill in the House, working its way through Congress with strong bipartisan support, that poses a significant danger to free speech. One would think this bill would be a big deal but, surprisingly, the bill has not received much coverage in the mainstream media.

Donald Trump’s Twitter transgender directive faces stiff backlash


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Civil rights and legal advocacy groups vowed swift court challenges if President Trump's Twitter-declared ban on transgender people serving in the U.S. military becomes Pentagon policy. "After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military," Trump tweeted yesterday.

Trump’s one-two punch hits birth control, LGBT rights

In this May 4, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds up a signed executive order aimed at easing an IRS rule limiting political activity for churches in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. In an order that undercuts federal protections for LGBT people, Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a sweeping directive to agencies Friday to do as much as possible to accommodate those who claim their religious freedoms are being violated.

Using – free speech’ as a cover for discrimination

Jack Phillips is the operator of Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colo. The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal from Phillips, who has religious objections to same-sex marriage and had lost a discrimination case for refusing to create a cake to celebrate such a union.

ACLU Doubling Down Against State And Federal ‘Blue Lives Matter’ Bills

With Kentucky becoming the 13th state to adopt "Blue Lives Matter" legislation Wednesday, the ACLU is doubling down on opposing the police protections on both the federal and state levels, a spokeswoman told The Daily Caller News Foundation Friday. The Kentucky law makes attacking police a hate crime, and the new Back the Blue Act introduced by Texas Republicans Sen. John Cornyn and Rep. Ted Poe would introduce mandatory minimum sentences for crimes against police and introduce the death penalty for killing law enforcement officers.

Justice Ginsburg has to choose her historic legacy now

How is Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a spirited fighter all her life, going to react to the letter from 58 House Republicans who called for her recusal on the forthcoming travel ban case because of her public disparagement of President Trump during the campaign? Normally, all three branches of the federal government jealously protect their powers from encroachments by the other two. And Supreme Court justices are exempt from the rules of judicial conduct that would force a lesser judge in Ginsburg's position to recuse herself.

Donaldtrump 670×306

The US Supreme Court on Monday partially reinstated Donald Trump's controversial travel ban targeting citizens from six predominantly Muslim countries, prompting the president to claim a victory for national security. The nine justices, who will hear arguments in the case in October, said the ban could now be enforced for travelers from the targeted countries "who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

US does not need warrant to subpoena Oregon drug data

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency does not need a court order to subpoena a prescription drug database kept by the state of Oregon, but the ruling did not specify whether those subpoenas would violate constitutional protections. The ruling reverses a 2014 judge's ruling finding that the agency must obtain warrants to access the database, which Oregon uses to help healthcare providers identify abuse.

Religious Groups Divided Over Trump’s Executive Order

President Donald Trump holds up a signed executive order aimed at easing an IRS rule limiting political activity for churches Thursday The order also is created to allow religious groups to avoid a mandate to provide contraception coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law, the Affordable Care Act, potentially expanding an exemption that had been carved out in the courts. However, the nonprofit determined that the executive order, in its current state, would not affect the rights of the people.

ACLU of Texas Comment on Fatal Shooting of 15-Year-Old by Balch Springs Police Officer

Last Saturday night, 15-year-old Jordan Edwards was killed when Balch Springs Police Department officer Roy Oliver fired his rifle at a moving vehicle in which Edwards was a passenger. Police reports initially stated that the vehicle in question was reversing "in an aggressive manner," but Balch Springs Police Department chief Jonathan Haber has since confirmed that it was in fact moving away from Oliver when it was fired upon.

Massachusetts judge halves fees in panhandling case

But now a federal judge has said a phalanx of lawyers from Boston's Goodwin firm and their partners from the ACLU of Massachusetts got a bit aggressive themselves in asking for the legal fees they were entitled to under the Civil Rights Attorney's Fees Award Act after prevailing in Thayer, et al. v. City of Worcester.

Supreme Court rejects appeal for Latin American refugees seeking U.S. asylum

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected pleas for review hearings from more than 60 Central American women and children who are facing immediate deportation -- handing a legal victory to President Donald Trump 's administration as it steps up efforts to enforce federal immigration laws. The high court refused to hear the asylum seekers' case Monday, leaving in place a lower court ruling that denied their appeal to have their cases considered by an independent federal hearing.

Trump won’t release White House visitor logs; legal fight already underway

U.S. President Donald Trump's administration said Friday that it would not disclose the names of people who have visited the White House, ending a policy of President Barack Obama's that was created to promote transparency. While the Obama administration claimed to release visitor records voluntarily, the Obama-era policy was actually the result of administration officials trying to settle a lawsuit against the George W. Bush administration.

Middle East Studies Assn., joins Md. Suit to block Trump Muslim Ban

Civil rights and refugee groups today asked a federal court in Maryland to block the Trump administration's revised executive order, arguing that it would cause irreparable harm for their plaintiffs. The order, which still maintains the suspension of refugee resettlement along with banning entry of nationals from six Muslim-majority countries, was issued on March 6. The groups that brought the case include the American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU of Maryland, and the National Immigration Law Center on behalf of the International Refugee Assistance Project at the Urban Justice Center, HIAS, and the Middle East Studies Association, along with individuals, including U.S. citizens, affected by the ban.

ACLU files complaint against Sessions over Senate testimony

To continue reading up to 10 premium articles, you must register , or sign up and take advantage of this exclusive offer: FILE - In this March 6, 2017 file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks in Washington. Christopher Anders, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a complaint against Sessions with the Alabama State Bar over his testimony during his Senate confirmation process regarding contact he had with Russia.

ACLU files complaint against Jeff Sessions over Russia testimony

The American Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday filed an ethics complaint with the Alabama State Bar against U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions for testimony he made about Russian officials during his confirmation hearing. "Mr. Sessions made false statements during sworn testimony on January 10, 2017, and in a subsequent written response to questions on January 17, 2017," the complaint reads.

Firing the ‘diversity’ bullet at the Marines

Dying in foreign lands in the service of a nation that enshrines freedom of religion in its Constitution doesn't cut any mustard with the irreligious Left. Alarmed by the presence of a crche complete with three Wise Men last Christmas on the grounds of the U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, the American Civil Liberties Union has joined forces with the oxymoronically-named Military Religious Freedom Foundation to put the camp's commanders in hot water.

Electronic media searches at border crossings raise worry

Watchdog groups that keep tabs on digital privacy rights are concerned that U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents are searching the phones and other digital devices of international travelers at border checkpoints in U.S. airports. The issue gained attention recently after at least three travelers, including a Canadian journalist, spoke out publicly about their experiences.

What to do if immigration officers come knockinga

The American Civil Liberties Union advises not opening your door unless the agents can show a warrant signed by a judge. What to do if immigration officers come knocking at your door The American Civil Liberties Union advises not opening your door unless the agents can show a warrant signed by a judge.

What immigrant advocates want you to do if ICE agents come to your door

The sudden and unexpected deportation of undocumented Mexican immigrant Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos has sparked fears that President Donald Trump is beginning to fulfill his campaign promise to expel 11 million people from the United States. US Immigration and Customs Enforcement , which deported Garcia de Rayos from Arizona to Mexico on Thursday, contends there was nothing special about her case and that the move does not signify a heightened crackdown on undocumented immigrants.

Following ACLU recommendations, Antioch Superintendent says district…


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Stepping into the national debate on illegal immigration and its possible impact on students, and following the recommendations by the American Civil Liberties Union , Antioch Superintendent Stephanie Anello posted a letter to parents and guardians on the district's website , recently, in an attempt to allay fears some students have been expressing to staff. Although the AUSD Board has not declared the district a sanctuary, as the Contra Costa Community College District did, last month, Anello felt it necessary to send the message, following receipt of a letter from the ACLU sent out on December 12, to all Superintendents in California.

ACLU files new lawsuit challenging Trump’s immigration order

The ACLU claims [press release] that the ban is unconstitutional under the First Amendment prohibition on government establishment of religion and the Fifth Amendment [text] guarantee of equal treatment under the law. The Department of Justice and the president have argued [JURIST report] that the order does not fall under the First Amendment as it does not specify religion, but country.

More

A lawyer challenging President Donald Trump's travel ban says that halting the executive order has not harmed the U.S. government. Instead, Washington state Solicitor General Noah Purcell told a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel on Tuesday that the order had harmed state residents.

Trump action figure proceeds will go to ACLU

A toy company is getting serious, saying it will now donate the profits from the sale of its President Trump action figure to the American Civil Liberties Union . The "Trump Over Re-Action Figure" was created by FCTRY last year following a Kickstarter campaign and has brought in nearly $200,000 so far.

Federal judges to hear arguments defending Trump travel ban


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Federal judges on opposite coasts are due Friday to hear legal arguments defending President Donald Trump's travel ban on citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The ban is sure to reverberate through the courts on a likely path to an appeals court or the U.S. Supreme Court.

Clinton tweets: ‘What I’m thinking about today’

Hillary Rodham Clinton Clinton tweets: 'What I'm thinking about today' Morgan Freeman on Trump: 'It feels like we are jumping off a cliff' Don't doubt Trump when it comes to the VA MORE on Tuesday tweeted that she is thinking about Khizr Khan, the father of a U.S. Army captain who was killed in Iraq, and an Iraqi interpreter who can reportedly no longer come to the United States due to President Donald Trump Clinton tweets: 'What I'm thinking about today' Report: State officials defy Spicer, send memo opposing travel ban NY attorney general joins ACLU lawsuit against Trump order MORE What I'm thinking about today: Khizr Khan: https://t.co/wrHK7IkBrG And a vet who fought with those now excluded: https://t.co/4LhNIT8xVo The tweet comes several days after Trump signed an executive order imposing a 90-day ban on nationals from seven predominantly Muslim countries entering the United States.

‘Christians in the Middle-East have been executed’: Trump …

US President Donald Trump speaks to staff at the Department of Homeland Security in Washington, DC, on January 25, 2017, where he vowed to restore "control" of US frontiers by building a wall on the Mexican border U.S. President Donald Trump fought back on Sunday amid growing international criticism, outrage from civil rights activists and legal challenges over his abrupt order for a halt on arrivals of refugees and people from seven Muslim-majority countries. In his most sweeping action since taking office on Jan. 20, Trump, a Republican, put a 120-day hold on Friday on allowing refugees into the country, an indefinite ban on refugees from Syria and a 90-day bar on citizens from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Judge halts Trump’s deportations

A federal judge's emergency order has temporarily barred the U.S. from deporting people from nations subject to President Donald Trump's travel ban. The judge said travelers who had been detained had a strong argument that their legal rights had been violated.

Inslee calls Trump order ‘cruelty;’ protests at Sea-Tac

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee blasted President Donald Trump's executive order banning people from certain Muslim-majority nations as "unjustifiable cruelty," and about 1,000 pro-immigration protesters gathered Saturday at Seattle-Tacoma Airport. Attorneys from the ACLU and the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project said a Somali national was not allowed to enter and two other people were detained at the airport.

Federal Judge Grants Stay on Trump Immigration Order for 2 Iraqis

A federal court in Brooklyn Saturday night granted an emergency stay on President Trump's executive order that bans immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries for two Iraqi men who had valid visas to enter the United States but were detained Saturday when they arrived in New York. Trump's order calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror, including Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya, for a time period of 90 days.

Judge halts implementation of Trump’s immigration order

A federal judge granted an emergency stay Saturday night for citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries who have already arrived in the US and those who are in transit, and who hold valid visas, ruling they can legally enter the US -- a decision that halts President Donald Trump's executive order barring citizens from those countries from entering the US for the next 90 days. "The petitioners have a strong likelihood of success in establishing that the removal of the petitioner and other similarly situated violates their due process and equal protection guaranteed by the United States Constitution," US District Judge Ann Donnelly wrote in her decision.

Federal judge blocks deportations mandated by Trump’s order

Judge Ann Donnelly of the U.S. District Court in Brooklyn granted a request from the ACLU to stay deportations of those detained on entry to the United States following President Donald Trump's executive order. After a brief hearing in front of a small audience that filtered in from a crowd of hundreds outside, Donnelly determined that the risk of injury to those detained by being returned to their home countries necessitated the decision.

Nation-Now 22 mins ago 9:48 p.m.ACLU blocks Trump’s unconstitutional Muslim ban

Protesters gather at JFK International Airport's Terminal 4 on Jan. 28, 2017, to demonstrate against President Trump's executive order to suspend refugee arrivals. President Trump's ban on immigration by citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries ran into at least a temporary roadblock Saturday night, after a U.S. District judge in Brooklyn granted an emergency stay sought by immigrants' rights lawyers.

Jeff Sessions vote expected next Tuesday, despite the ACLU’s request for delay

A Senate Judiciary Committee vote on the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions for Attorney General is expected to proceed Tuesday, according to a Senate staffer, despite requests by a civil liberties group to delay it in order to question the senator about executive actions signed by President Trump this week. The American Civil Liberties Union wrote to Sen. Charles Grassley and Sen. Dianne Feinstein , respectively the chairman and ranking member of the judiciary committee , asking them to cancel Tuesday's pending committee vote on Mr. Sessions nomination and to instead hold another round of questioning.

DOJ to unveil police reforms in Baltimore

A consent decree is expected to be signed by city officials in a special morning meeting, CNN-affiliate WBAL-TV reported. The decree would likely require better tracking of problematic officers, more documentation of citizen interaction and use of force reporting, the station reported.

NAACP head calls Sessions ‘unfit’ for attorney general

The head of one of the largest African-American civil rights organization told Congress on Wednesday that Sen. Jeff Sessions is "unfit to serve" as attorney general as a 1986 letter from the widow of Martin Luther King Jr., surfaced strongly expressing opposition to the Alabama senator. Cornell Brooks, the head of the NAACP, said the organization "firmly believes" that Sessions is unfit to serve as attorney general in the incoming Trump administration.

Highlights From Jeff Sessions’ Confirmation Hearing — So Far


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Senator Jeff Sessions, President-elect Trump's nominee for attorney general, went before his colleagues today in a marathon confirmation hearing -- now on its fifth hour and still ongoing. If confirmed, and so far it looks like Sessions will be confirmed, the Republican Senator from Alabama will become the head of the Department of Justice and the chief lawyer and law enforcement officer in the federal government.

Lawsuits Challenge Abortion Restrictions in 3 States

Taking the offensive after Election Day setbacks, Planned Parenthood and its allies filed lawsuits Wednesday in North Carolina, Missouri and Alaska challenging laws that they view as unconstitutional restrictions on abortion. "We are going to fight back state by state and law by law until every person has the right to pursue the life they want, including the right to decide to end a pregnancy," said Planned Parenthood's chief medical officer, Dr. Raegan McDonald-Mosley.

Lawsuits challenge abortion restrictions in 3 states

Taking the offensive after Election Day setbacks, Planned Parenthood and its allies filed lawsuits Wednesday in North Carolina, Missouri and Alaska challenging laws that they view as unconstitutional restrictions on abortion. "We are going to fight back state by state and law by law until every person has the right to pursue the life they want, including the right to decide to end a pregnancy," said Planned Parenthood's chief medical officer, Dr. Raegan McDonald-Mosley.

Kentucky denies atheist request for ‘Im God’ license plates

An atheist's request to say "IM GOD" on his license plate was denied by the state of Kentucky, which said it might distract other drivers, could spark confrontations and would be in bad taste. Bennie L. Hart says that by driving around with the "IM GOD" message, he simply wants to spread his views about religion - that it's impossible to disprove anyone's claim to being "God."

State denies atheist request for ‘Im God’ license plates

An atheist's request to say "IM GOD" on his license plate was denied by the state of Kentucky, which said it might distract other drivers, could spark confrontations and would be in bad taste. Bennie L. Hart said that by driving around with the "IM GOD" message, he simply wants to spread his views about religion - that it's impossible to disprove anyone's claim to being "God."

Why US inmates launched a nationwide strike

Last month, on the 45th anniversary of the infamous Attica Prison uprising, tens of thousands of US inmates launched a nationwide protest that continues today, according to advocates who helped organize the effort. The inmates' grievances are as varied as the states they came from: Pennies for labor in South Carolina, racial discrimination in California, excessive force in Michigan.

Editorial: Overcoming more barriers to voter suppression

Thanks to Secretary of State Kris Kobach, it has become unnecessarily complicated for thousands of Kansans to participate in this year's elections. Although district and federal court judges have ordered Kobach to accept the registrations of 20,000 voters who failed to provide proof-of-citizenship documents when they filed their applications, this morass of legal proceedings has made it difficult for Kansans to know where they stand.

Free Speech Advocates Team Up To Defend Arrested Anti-BLM Protester

The ACLU, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education , and other legal experts are collectively denouncing the arrest of an anti-Black Lives Matter demonstrator at East Tennessee State University , saying criminal charges brought against the protester are grossly unconstitutional. Tristan Rettke, an 18-year-old freshman, showed up to a BLM rally Sept.

Appeals court says U.S. ‘motor voter’ law preempts Kansas ID rules

A U.S. appeals court has upheld a lower court ruling requiring Kansas to allow thousands of people who registered to vote at motor vehicle offices to stay on election rolls, despite not showing proof of citizenship as mandated by a state law. The decision, filed in court papers late on Friday by the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, clears the way for these voters to take part in the U.S. election in November.

Three years after his revelations, Snowden in spotlight again

When President Xi Jinping and US President Barack Obama were about to meet in the California desert resort of Sunnylands in June 2013, the US government had worked hard to paint China as a villain in cyberspace. The revelation made by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden just days before the shirt-sleeves meeting, however, shocked the world.

N.C. drops ‘bathroom bill’ lawsuit: Why that won’t settle the issue

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory dropped a lawsuit against the federal government Friday, but debate over the state's so-called 'bathroom bill' rages on. North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks June 24 during a candidate forum in Charlotte, N.C. After suing the federal government in May to defend the state's controversial new law limiting LGBT rights, Gov. McCrory dropped the lawsuit Friday.

Trump’s ‘Softening’ Can’t Make His Immigration Stance Popular


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Recent polls indicate that less than a quarter of Americans think the 11 million or so people who live in this country without the government's permission should be forcibly removed. That lack of enthusiasm for mass deportation explains Donald Trump's much-ballyhooed " softening " on immigration, which has produced a mushy mess.

67 Organizations Urge Justice Dept. to Improve Data Collection Mandate on Deaths in Police Custody

In a letter sent yesterday, the organizations responded to DOJ's proposal for implementing the Deaths in Custody Reporting Act , which requires police departments across the country to disclose details to the federal government about custodial deaths. DICRA was signed into law in 2014 in response to a troubling lack of reliable data on these deaths and DOJ is currently collecting comments on its implementation proposal that was published August 4, 2016.

Partial Victory: University of NC Blocked from Enforcing ‘Bathroom Bill’

Moral Monday demonstrators rally against North Carolina's anti-transgender House Bill 2 in May. A U.S. judge on Friday ordered the University of North Carolina to allow transgender students and staff to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity, blocking enforcement of the state's controversial "bathroom bill" known as House Bill 2, while a lawsuit challenging the anti-LGBTQ legislation proceeds. "Today, the tightness that I have felt in my chest every day since H.B. 2 passed has eased.

White House Releases Policy on Drone Strikes

In response to a court order in an American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit, the Obama administration released a redacted version of a document outlining the federal government's policy on drone strikes. The disclosure of the 18-page presidential policy guidance, or PPG, follows the May 2013 release of a "fact sheet" describing the document.

US Releases More Details of Policy on Drone Attacks

A U.S. airman guides a U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone as it taxis to the runway at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, March 9, 2016. The White House has released an edited version of President Barack Obama's once-secret policy on using drone aircraft to combat terrorists around the world, the American Civil Liberties Union said Saturday.

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The Indiana attorney general's office said Tuesday that it chose not to appeal a judge's order blocking a state law that would ban abortions sought due to fetal genetic abnormalities because the ruling is temporary while the case moves forward. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana sued the state in April over the law, saying it's unconstitutional and violates women's privacy rights.

ACLU Preparing For Legal Challenges If Trump Gets Elected

U.S. Republican presidential candidate and businessman Donald Trump speaks to the media regarding money he listed as being donated to veterans groups at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 31, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson The American Civil Liberties Union released a 28-page report Friday arguing most of presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's governing agenda is unconstitutional, and promises to keep a running tally of all Trump's policy goals that run afoul of the Constitution.

ACLU’s Jameel Jaffer to direct Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced his appointment of Jameel Jaffer, deputy legal director at the ACLU, as founding director of the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University. Last month, Columbia and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced the creation of the new institute which will work-through litigation, research and public advocacy-to preserve and expand the freedoms of expression and the press in the digital age.

The Latest: Some Texas abortion clinics likely won’t reopen

Amy Hagstrom Miller, second from right, founder of Whole Woman's Health, a Texas women's health clinic that provides abortions, leaves the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 27, 2016, with Center for Reproductive Rights President Nancy Northup, far right, as the justices struck down the strict Texas anti-abortion restriction law known as HB2. The justices voted 5-3 in favor of Texas clinics that had argued the regulations were a thinly veiled attempt to make it harder for women to get an abortion in the nation's second-most populous state.

Source: Delayed Texas Abortion Data Finished Months Ago

Lauren Baker of Plano and Mary Baumgard of Minnesota held signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court March 2, 2016, as the court arguments in a case on a Texas abortion law. The process of compiling much-anticipated Texas abortion statistics for 2014 - expected to reflect the impact of abortion restrictions passed by the 2013 legislature - followed its normal course up until February of this year, a health agency insider says.

10th Circuit: Kansas can’t block voters from casting ballots

Kansas cannot prevent thousands of eligible voters from casting ballots in the November federal election because they didn't prove they were U.S. citizens when registering to vote at motor vehicle offices, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling temporarily upholds a court order that required Kansas to allow those individuals to vote in federal elections even though they didn't provide citizenship documentation when applying or renewing their driver's licenses, as required under Kansas law.

Civil Rights Groups Ask Appeals Court to Block Judge’s Immigration Order

Group gathered from all around Texas and marched to the Governor's Mansion to show their support fro DACA and DAPA A coalition of civil and immigrant rights groups on Friday asked an appeals court to stop a federal judge's order that requires the Obama administration to turn over the confidential information of thousands of undocumented immigrants. by the National Immigration Law Center, the American Civil Liberties Union Immigrants' Rights Project and the ACLU of Texas is on behalf of four undocumented immigrants, including two Texans.

Another bathroom lawsuit filed; is Arkansas in it?

Led by Texas, 11 states have sued the federal government in Texas over President Obama's reminder that the law says transgender students are protected by non-discrimination law, including in using bathrooms aligned with their gender. Early coverage doesn't answer these questions that come immediately to mind: 1) What is the cause of legal action against a reminder of the law ? As yet, the government hasn't cut off money to any school that discriminates against transgender students.

Document sheds light on how president approves drone strikes

President Barack Obama must approve operational plans to target overseas terror suspects with drones or other weapons outside war zones, but in some cases does not sign off on specific strikes, according to newly-declassified administration guidelines. In addition to setting out the role of the president, the guidelines emphasize the importance of "verifying" the identity of high value targets, even as they outline the criteria and legality of striking unidentified others when "necessary to achieve U.S. policy objectives."